Monday, December 27, 2010

Ice Cream



Ice Cream is a favorite food for so many people. My youngest son is a big fan but has allergies. Eggs tops the list of many. He can tolerate A2 milk. I googled A2 Milk and found this website and here is an excerpt -
The Origins of a2 Milk™

There are two main forms of the important cow's milk protein beta-casein found in the cow's milk that you drink. These two forms are known as A1 and A2 beta-casein.

The A2 form of beta-casein has been identified by scientific research to be the original form of beta-casein that would have been produced by cows thousands of years ago.


At some point in history, owing to natural genetic mutation, the A1 form appeared in dairy cattle and was spread throughout dairy herds across Europe, becoming the common form of beta-casein in many breeds of cows.

Traditional cattle breeds such as the zebu, the native Asian cattle and closely related animals such as the water buffalo and yak all still only produce the A2 type of beta- casein.

Some dairy cows still only produce the A2 type of beta casein and these can be identified and milked to produce a2 Milk™.

by Professor Keith Woodford.
2007. Craig Potton Publishing (Christchurch)
"Devil in the Milk"

No 2 Son can drink A2 milk and cream and the Jersey (cow) milk man at the local farmers market was sure that he would be alright with his product. So I made an eggless batch for Christmas.. I detailed my adventures on buying an ice cream churn here

Audax Artifax cook extraordinaire details lots of info about ice cream making on his blog and with a bit of inspiration from him I wrote my own recipe and have done several test runs and I have tweaked it enough to be delicious.

I made two batches one with eggs that I folded fresh raspberries and 1/2 cup of raspberry jam through. Using the same recipe minus the eggs I made a second batch and folded 2/3 cup nutella and 125 grams of chopped toasted hazelnuts through that. I sent the leftover nutella/hazelnut variety home with No 2 son or I would have eaten the whole lot, it was fantastic.
My granddaughters loved both and No 2 Granddaughter has a slight intolerance to some dairy but she is fine with the A2 as well.
By adding the tapoica flour I was able to boil the egg mixture and not risk curdling it. Favorite Daughter in law is having our No3 grandchild in March and is very careful with her diet so I didn't want to risk undercooking the egg custard mixture. After making ice cream with and without the flour only the most rabid of ice cream connisours would know the difference. Also the tapioca adn corn cornflour is low allergenic. Fine almond flour would work too.

Easy Vanilla Ice Cream
Ingredients
2 cups (500ml) whole milk
A pinch of salt
3/4 cup (150g) sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla paste
300ml heavy cream
2 eggs
1 teaspoon tapioca flour or 2 teaspoons cornflour.

Method 1 With eggs
Heat the milk over a low heat until just starting to simmer.
In a separate bowl, beat the eggs with the sugar, using an electric whisk until thick and pale. Add the tapioca or cornflour and beat until smooth. While whisking or beating slowly pour in the hot milk.
Place mixture into pot and stir over low heat until the mixture is thick and starts to boil.
Strain the custard into the heavy cream. Stir over the ice until cool, add the vanilla paste, then refrigerate to chill thoroughly. Preferably overnight or put it in the freezer to chill.
Freeze the custard in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. I have a cheap version of an ice cream maker. You put the bowl in the freezer and then put your custard in and put the stirrer section where the motor is on it and churn away. It works like a charm but I find it works best if the custard has started to freeze a bit.

Method 2 Without Eggs
Omit the eggs and use the following method.
Blend the tapioca flour and milk
Place mixture into pot and stir over low heat until the mixture is thick and starts to boil.
Strain the custard into the heavy cream. Whisk gently until smooth. Stir over the ice until cool, add the vanilla paste, then refrigerate to chill thoroughly. Preferably overnight or put it in the freezer to chill until it starts to freeze.

Freeze the custard in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. I have a cheap version of an ice cream maker. You put the bowl in the freezer and then put your custard in and put the stirrer section where the motor is on it and churn away. It works like a charm but I find it works best if the custard has started to freeze a bit.
We are headed for a bit of hot weather the TV tells me. I might be able to put my winter dressing gown and ugg boots away. I am wearing them tonight while Western Australia has 40 degrees Celsius. It's a funny lot of weather this year. Ice cream weather is coming though and that is the main thing.

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